Help Advocate to Keep Medicaid Services

Looming budget cuts to Medicaid will effect benefits to many people, including those with special needs.  Recently the Stepping Stones Learning Center in Rochester closed its doors suddenly leaving many families without services for their children and the staff unemployed. Read the article and view the video-it genuinely exemplifies, “Just because you have a service today doesn’t mean you will have one tomorrow.”

http://www.twcnews.com/nys/rochester/news/2017/06/29/irondequoit-learning-center-stepping-stones-closing.html

The obvious MAJOR advocacy item front and center is the salvation of Medicaid.  Please take the time to lobby and advocate for the maintenance of this “Lifeline” funding source.  If it is “lost” it will effect school-age and post-secondary in a catastrophic manner for everyone’s loved one(s) and their families.

You CANNOT depend upon someone else to advocate for the salvation of Medicaid funding/reimbursement..  Take the time to follow through with these advocacy efforts over and over again as quickly as possible.

To call your Representative, follow these simple steps:

Call the United States Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121. To avoid problems because of different time zones between your state and Washington, D.C.it is best to call in the morning Eastern Time.

When the switchboard operators answer, ask to be connected to the office of your Representative.

In order to speak with your Representative’s office, you will need to give the operator your zip code. In some cases, there are more than one congressional districts within a zip code, so you may need to give the operator your full address to determine the correct Representative.

The operator will then connect you to your Representative’s office.

Sample Phone Script:

As your constituent, I urge you to ensure that the financial security and health of our families are not bargained away. Please support raising the debt ceiling without devastating cuts to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Our road map to economic recovery cannot rely on tax cuts for the wealthy and the dismantling of essential services for those who need it the most.